The staff and lawyers at Pushor Mitchell extend our best wishes to our readers
for a happy holiday season and the very best in 2011!

In this issue - #142 December 24, 2010

  1. Pushor Mitchell Voted Best Law Firm In The Central Okanagan 
  2. The Top Ten Mistakes That Could Screw Up Your ICBC Claim, Mistake #8 
  3. Old, Old, Old Claims For Vacation Pay 
  4. Is The Air Space Above A Strata Lot The “Common Property” Of The Strata Corporation? 
  5. 'Twas The Night Before Christmas, Legal Version 
  6. Diner Sues Restaurant For Not Teaching How To Eat Artichoke 
  7. The Role Of The Civil Justice System In Toy Safety 
  8. Man Threatens To Re-Possess Ex-Girlfriend's Breasts 
  9. Texts, Web Really Do Allow Santa To Be Everywhere 

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Pushor Mitchell Voted Best Law Firm In The Central Okanagan

The results are in and we are delighted that Pushor Mitchell was voted as the Best Law Firm in the Central Okanagan for 2010 by readers of Okanagan Life in their 16th Annual Readers' Choice Awards.

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The Top Ten Mistakes That Could Screw Up Your ICBC Claim, Mistake #8 - by Paul Mitchell, Q.C.

This series, by Pushor Mitchell personal Injury lawyer Paul Mitchell Q.C,.will explain the Top Ten mistakes to avoid with your ICBC claim. The article will give tips on how to ensure you do not make serious mistakes that could be fatal to your claim. For 10 issues of Legal Alert, Paul will focus on one mistake you should avoid, and what you should do instead to ensure your claim is not prejudiced.

 

Mistake # 8) Failing to have the vehicles and accident site immediately investigated by an accident reconstruction engineer.

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Old, Old, Old Claims For Vacation Pay - by Alfred Kempf*

Our Supreme Court in a recent wrongful dismissal claim, Pritchard v. The Stuffed Animal House Ltd., determined that an employee suing for wrongful dismissal could recover for unused vacation days going back some 12 years.

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Is The Air Space Above A Strata Lot The “Common Property” Of The Strata Corporation? - by Mark Danielson

In Chan v. Owners, Strata Plan VR-151, 2010 BCSC 1725, the Supreme Court of British Columbia considered the ability of a strata corporation to regulate the air space above a strata lot – an issue that had not been considered in the context of the Strata Property Act, S.B.C. 1998, c. 43 (the “SPA”) or its precursor legislation. Chan also demonstrates that purchasers should be wary of assurances of “grandfather protection” excusing compliance with existing bylaws, even when such assurances are made by the strata corporation.

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'Twas The Night Before Christmas, Legal Version

Whereas, on or about the night prior to Christmas, there did occur at a certain improved piece of real property (hereinafter "the House") a general lack of stirring by all creatures therein, including, but not limited to a mouse.

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Diner Sues Restaurant For Not Teaching How To Eat Artichoke

Suits against restaurants happen all the time. Usually the offending meal gets someone really ill, or worse. Lawsuits on the proper way to eat food are less common. Never say never when it comes to FindLaw's Legally Weird, though.

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The Role Of The Civil Justice System In Toy Safety

For years, some corporations have knowingly shipped toys with hidden dangers like small parts, loose magnets, asbestos, and other toxic chemicals, until outrage from parents and civil actions forced regulators or manufacturers to act. This Report explores the role of the civil justice system and the legal profession in protecting children from unforeseen hazards in toys, and also has some excellent resources for parents.

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Man Threatens To Re-Possess Ex-Girlfriend's Breasts

If your boyfriend gives you a loan so that you can get breast implants, what happens if you don't pay him back in full?

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Texts, Web Really Do Allow Santa To Be Everywhere

He sees you when you're sleeping, he knows when you're awake, and he knows how many followers you have on Twitter.

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